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Educational Choice News

"At Ed School, Researcher Talks New York City School Choice" from The Harvard Crimson

on Wednesday, 25 October 2017.

Dozens of educators, researchers, and students gathered at the Graduate School of Education Tuesday to discuss research on school choice in New York City public schools.

Princeton sociology professor Jennifer L. Jennings headlined the event, the second installment in the Center for Education Policy Research public seminar series. Jennings’s research focuses on finding a way to level the playing field in New York City’s school matching program—since 2004, eighth graders in the city have been required to rank their preferred high schools, a program that Jennings and other have found to lead to disparate educational outcomes.

Continue reading "At Ed School, Researcher Talks New York City School Choice" from The Harvard Crimson.

"The Only National Black School Choice Advocacy Group Is Folding" from Education Week

on Wednesday, 25 October 2017.

The Black Alliance for Educational Options is shutting down for good at the end of the year, the group announced on its website Wednesday.

Founded by school choice pioneer Howard Fuller, BAEO is the only group at the national level focused exclusively on expanding school choice for low-income and working class African-American families—both through charter schools and school vouchers.

But the school choice advocacy world has become increasingly crowded in the 18 years since BAEO's founding, said Fuller who sits on the group's board, and that's meant more competition for visibility and funding.

"Some organizations, and ours is one of them, have a shelf-life," he said. "And we just reached a point where we had done great work but didn't see the ability to continue to do that work going forward."

Continue reading "The Only National Black School Choice Advocacy Group Is Folding" from Education Week.

"Millennials, Especially of Color, Are Disrupting Charter School Debate" from The Hill

on Wednesday, 04 October 2017.

As the number of children attending public charter schools increases, the debate over the role of charter schools in our public education system has intensified.

Are public charter schools better than traditional public schools? Do charter schools serve the same kids as traditional public schools?  Should states place a moratorium on charter growth?

These questions, among others, imply false choices that mask the ways traditional public schools and public charters complement one another. But there’s hope for a path forward that pierces the polarized fire-fight that too often characterizes current discussions about charters — Millennials.

Continue reading "Millennials, Especially of Color, Are Disrupting Charter School Debate" from The Hill. 

"Waiting In The Dark: In NOLA, School Choice Brings Early Mornings, Long Bus Rides" from WWNO

on Tuesday, 03 October 2017.

On a corner in the Ninth Ward, four elementary school kids are waiting for their bus under a street lamp. It's dark outside. A bony cat slinks across the street, and a rooster crows somewhere — prematurely since the sun is nowhere in sight.

Minutes later, headlights appear at the far end of the street, and a yellow school bus pulls up. The kids climb aboard and wave goodbye to David Brooks — dad to two of the kids and uncle to the others. Their school day has begun, and it's barely 6 a.m.

New Orleans is one of few cities in the country that's all in on charter schools. More than 90 percent of Orleans Parish public school students attend charter schools. Leaders of the city's post-Katrina education overhaul tout rises in student test scores, graduation rates, and ACT scores. But with those improvements have come new challenges for families when it comes to getting to school.

Continue reading "Waiting In The Dark: In NOLA, School Choice Brings Early Mornings, Long Bus Rides" from WWNO.

"Is School Choice Enough?" from National Affairs

on Thursday, 28 September 2017.

As with so many issues — from trade and immigration to Russia and taxes — the Trump presidency has exposed a schism within the conservative movement when it comes to education policy. While expanding parental choice is a paramount objective on the right, a key question is whether choice alone is enough, or if results-based accountability ought to be sustained and strengthened, too. How this question is resolved will have wide-ranging consequences — for education reform in general and for the design of school-choice initiatives in particular.

Let's start in the realm of broad agreement: Conservatives believe that parents should be able to choose schools for their children that match their educational priorities and moral values. This principle stems from our deep respect for the family as the building block of a free society. A child is not a "mere creature of the state," and thus the state should not get to dictate where the child attends school.

Continue reading "Is School Choice Enough?" from National Affairs