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English as a New Language

Archbishop Gomez Visits Holy Cross Grade School

Theo Helm on Tuesday, 10 October 2017.

Archbishop José H. Gomez of Los Angeles visited Holy Cross School in South Bend on October 3 to celebrate Mass and visit the school’s dual-language immersion program.

Cardinal Blase Cupich Missions 255 ACE Teachers and Leaders

Theo Helm on Tuesday, 01 August 2017.

Cardinal Blase Cupich of the Archdiocese of Chicago blessed 255 teachers and leaders as part of the Alliance for Catholic Education’s (ACE) Missioning Mass on July 27 as they prepared to leave the University of Notre Dame’s campus and serve students in Cathoilc schools around the country. 

ENL Partners with Institute for Latino Studies to Launch a Dual-Language Immersion Program

on Thursday, 30 March 2017.

Notre Dame Institute for Latino Studies Dual-Language Immersion

The English as New Language Program (ENL) is proud to announce a collaboration with Notre Dame’s Institute of Latino Studies and Holy Cross Grade School in South Bend to launch a Spanish-English Immersion Program beginning at the pre-kindergarten and kindergarten grades.

Creating Community through Inclusion

on Wednesday, 16 November 2016.

By: Lauren Kloser

Paty Salazar Harty Creating Communities of Inclusion

For Paty Salazar Harty, the dedicated service of her parents’ lives has informed and inspired her work in Catholic schools. Growing up, Paty saw what it truly meant to help others. She watched as her father, who grew up in extreme poverty in Mexico with fifteen brothers and sisters, and her mother, who came from a home in Mexico where survival was more important than literacy, sacrificed their time and talents to help others in need. Her father, a mechanic, isn’t technically in the social services profession, but that didn’t stop him from naming his business “Amigos,” in acknowledgment that friends are there to help others. Her mother, who graduated from college in Mexico, knew that Catholic education was the way for her children to succeed – not just in the professional world, but also in their spiritual development.

Celebrando la Virgen de Guadalupe

Written by Katy Lichon, Ph.D., Clare Roach, M.Ed., Jennifer Dees, M.Ed. on Tuesday, 15 November 2016.

The English as a New Language team provides recommendations and a number of resources, including a printable worship program, for you to celebrate the upcoming feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe in your school.

St.AndrewSLC 5Students at St. Andrew School in Salt Lake City, UT, dress in indigenous clothing and present gifts to La Virgencita.

For your students and families of Mexican origin, Our Lady of Guadalupe or La Guadalupana represents a powerful and deep devotion to the loving and caring mother of God. By celebrating the feast day of the Blessed Lady, the patroness of the Americas, on December 12th, your school can draw attention to the universality of the Church and the beauty of Marian devotions. More importantly, it offers your learning community the grace of participating in and honoring a magnificently rich tradition celebrated for centuries by the Mexican people.

As described by Fr. Virgilio Elizondo (2011), Our Lady of Guadalupe represents the “mother of new humanity” because she bridges for the Americas the Old World and the New. In 1531 when La Virgencita appeared to Juan Diego, the native peoples of Mexico had just been defeated by the Spanish armies and were in need of hope, rebirth, and spiritual healing. La Morenita (which translated means “brown skinned one”) appeared not to the powerful Spanish, but to the humble Juan Diego, an Aztec man, to ask that he approach the bishop and request that a church be built in her honor. The bishop was incredulous, but Mary appeared to Juan Diego again. This time when Juan Diego encountered the bishop, he had the brown skinned image of Our Lady of Guadalupe on his tilma (cloak) and his arms were full of roses, which were exceedingly rare in the region. Having won the bishop’s blessing, a shrine was built on the top of Mount Tepeyac, the hill where Mary appeared to Juan Diego. Today the Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe in Mexico City is the most visited Catholic shrine in the world and it continues to represent a place of protection, consolation, mestizaje (mixture of races) , and unity.

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